Forest Queen…

“In my dreams

I’m surrounded by beautiful, beautiful green

I lay down on the forest floor

I feel the pines on my skin

God if I could just do this everyday

I’d have no complaints to say

I dream I’m gazing up at the clouds

And I know I want to live this life Loud

I want to spread the message

That this is how we should live our life

No more bad days, no more anger

No more lies

Just peace, breathing in and out

The crisp air making me feel alive

Tracing the bark of the tree with my fingertips

Feel all the different patterns and all it’s scars

Running the dandelions on my chin

Like we used to do when we were kids

Smelling the wildflowers

Blocking my eyes from the sun

That one beam of light that reached the forest floor

It’s where the old me transforms

And I see everything clearly

And I know life can be more.

A real live forest queen for future folklore…”

Poem by me…original copyright 5/21

Have a great evening…

Bizarre ‘Bigfoot trap’ is still being maintained after 48 years | Unexplained Mysteries

Nestled deep in the woods of Jackson County, Oregon, there can be found a trap which was built to capture a live Bigfoot.
— Read on www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/357341/bizarre-bigfoot-trap-is-still-being-maintained-after-48-years

BIGFOOT SIGHTING IN UTAH

TREASURE HUNTING CAN TAKE A TURN IN THE WRONG DIRECTION Cast: Stephen B. Shaffer (Doc) ~ Steve Shaffer The Treasures in America team was in the Uinta Mountains, searching for the Lost Josephine Mine in 2018. During this 5 day excursion, Steve Shaffer came to help assist us with the buried cache and the lost mine. We were not expecting this story to happen! “Treasure hunting has always come with baggage. Sometimes it’s paranormal, sometimes its something else that man can’t understand. You never
— Read on www.unchartedexpedition.com/post/scary-bigfoot-sighting-utah

Sasquatch in the News…The Great Struggle

Although I have a lovely picture above of theee two strong marvelous creatures fishing together, this encounter is not a friendly one…

HARRISON MILLS, Feb. 23 A terrific battle a fight for life of prodigious strength matched against savage ferocity between a hairy giant of the Sasquatch and a huge bear, which after ten minutes of wild struggle, fury and rage, ended in the strangling of bruin when the wild man of the Chehalis hinterlands crushed the life out of him. The story of this unusual drama of the wilderness was told by three Harrison River Indians who were spectators of the singular incident one evening last week as they were walking along the Chehalis river close to the canyon

. “It was a skookum (strong) fight, ugh’, ugh’,” said Jimmy Craneback, one of the. trio of spectators, “and as no one of our little party had ever seen a hairy giant of the Sasquatch in a fight before, I’m telling you we got the biggest kick of our life. It was a hair – raising fight between savage and brute.” Asked how they came to witness the unusual battle, Jimmy said, “We were on our way home after an all – day unsuccessful hunt in the Chehalis mountains. We had just crossed the government road at the Chehalis river a mile or so north of the Indian village, when all at once we heard a roar in the forest ahead of us that shook the firs and cedars around and startled the crows and bluejays from their roost. We stopped to listen. Down the old trail ahead of us we could hear groans, growls, thuds and the snap and crack of rotten branches as If old Nick himself had gone off his noodle and was running amuck through the dark forest,” The hunter said that they were not afraid for their own safety as each of them carried a rifle. “But we were worried,” went on Jimmy, “that some old woman of the Chehalis might be in the forest digging roots for baskets and was being mauled by a bear, for bear at this time of the year are lean, vicious and hungry. “In silence we loaded our rifles hurriedly. “Fifty yards or so down the wooded trail we came upon a sight that made our eyes pop. In awe we stopped dead in our tracks. In the fading twilight and shadowy forest we first thought we were looking on two bears fighting each other to the death.

As we stood beside a log twenty yards away we could see the great struggle of strength. There was a crunching of bones as the monsters in their rage came to grips with each other – and tumbled and tossed about in their fury on the forest floor within a few feet of the Chehalis. But there was something about one of the monsters that puzzled us.” The hunters were now so excited with this hitherto unwitnessed drama of the wilderness that they wished to see the victor of the contest before they raised their rifles. “We wouldn’t have raised our rifles when we did,” explained Jimmy, “but it looked as if they were about to roll over the bank into the river any moment and we didn’t want to lose such big game. But then we never shot, for as we raised our rifles we were startled by a yell it had in it something human and came from one of. the combatants, which to our astonished ears sounded like “poo – woo – uoo.’ ” ‘Good, gosh,’ said Ike Joe as we lowered our rifles, ‘boys its a Sasquatch and a bear we’ll take the side of the giant, its well to be on their side. He’s put up a great fight let’s step in and help him.’ ” The boys were In a sweat, but happy the Sasquatch gave a “pooh – woo,” which timely utterance had no doubt saved his life.

“Finally,” said Jimmy, “the giant got his powerful hairy arms around the bear’s neck. It must have been a hu’m – dinger of a hold for the bear began to gasp for breath, and gasping pawed the air as his tongue was hanging out. The wild man had won the fight. With a grunt he flung the carcass of the bear into the river.” Asked was the Sasquatch a big fellow, Jimmy looked surprised. “You should know,” he grinned, “that it takes more than an infant to choke the daylights out of a big bear.” It does.

The Chilliwack Progress
Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada
Wed, Mar 02, 1938

Bigfoot in the News…Vancouver Island

A hair raising encounter with A hairy

giant, A first hand account from

an Indian, a chief’s grandson, who once came face to face with a hairy Sasquatch and barely escaped with his life, the witness is a highly respected resident of the Songhees Reserve, here is how he described the creature, “His eyes glowed like the noonday sun, and the hair on his body was like moss on the rocks. His voice sounded like the roar of a surf from a heavy sea.”

The old Indian related that in his youth he was searching for a young deer up a mountain slope. When he reached the summit there was no deer. He was about to retrace his steps when he heard a loud roar. “At first I was like a frozen man, even the rocks were trembling. I looked up and there, not far away from me was a hairy man maybe 18 feet tall. As tall as a mountain tree. He was holding the deer. I remember that my spirit animal guide was a wolf, that it made me fast, so I turned and ran like the wind, he was throwing trees at me. You can still see the trees up there on the mountain rotting.”

From the description of the mountain he gave, it is Mount Matheson, near Rocky Point. He said they have always lived on Vancouver Island, but now that it’s settled they have moved to the interior…

Excerpt from the Times Colonist, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 26 Apr 1957,

You Are Wild..

“It’s time to break away from the myth that the wild is something exotic that exists somewhere else. It isn’t. We are all wild things…”

~Rewild.org

And here are some of their tips for you to start rewilding yourself…

learn the names of the trees you’re walking through.

Learn the types of bugs you’re walking on

Learn what is edible out in the forest.

Learn the wildlife in your area.

And finally my advice for wilders and squatchers… just sit quietly in a spot of the woods you enjoy and just listen…learn the noises of your favorite forest. The birds, the critters, the wind. If you want to find out if the noises you hear could be a bigfoot you should learn to rule out what the natural sounds are out there so you can debunk.

All of these tips are good for anyone that spends time out there. Bushcrafters, bigfoot researchers, hikers, birders and just nature enthusiasts alike.

Art by Jirka Houska-malby

Have an awesome rewilding Wednesday’

Go wild…

Sociality predicts orangutan vocal phenotype | Nature Ecology & Evolution

In humans, individuals’ social setting determines which and how language is acquired. Social seclusion experiments show that sociality also guides vocal development in songbirds and marmoset monkeys, but absence of similar great ape data has been interpreted as support to saltational notions for language origin, even if such laboratorial protocols are unethical with great apes. Here we characterize the repertoire entropy of orangutan individuals and show that in the wild, different degrees of sociality across populations are associated with different ‘vocal personalities’ in the form of distinct regimes of alarm call variants. In high-density populations, individuals are vocally more original and acoustically unpredictable but new call variants are short lived, whereas individuals in low-density populations are more conformative and acoustically consistent but also exhibit more complex call repertoires. Findings provide non-invasive evidence that sociality predicts vocal phenotype in a wild great ape. They prove false hypotheses that discredit great apes as having hardwired vocal development programmes and non-plastic vocal behaviour. Social settings mould vocal output in hominids besides humans. Analysis of wild orangutan calls demonstrates that different degrees of sociality across populations are associated with different ‘vocal personalities’.
— Read on www.nature.com/articles/s41559-022-01689-z

Throat Singing for Bigfoot…

https://www.reddit.com/r/bigfoot/comments/tgkfw3/bigfoot_on_tiktok_no_seriously/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app&utm_name=iossmf

This was an interesting post from Reddit. You know I’ve never been fond of the yelling and knocking technique, my technique has always been to enter the woods passively.

But what about throat singing to communicate. It’s less aggressive and more mesmerizing I would think.

By the early 21st century, throat-singing was once again used to lull babies to sleep, lure wild and semidomesticated animals, help gain the favour of the spirit of the place, and summon shamanic spirits and Buddhist gods.. . -Brittanica

If throat singing can lure semi domesticated animals in, what about a bigfoot. Would this be more passive and pleasing to them?


“The primatologists at the University of St. Andrews discovered that wild gibbons in Thailand have developed a unique song as a natural defense to predators. Literally singing for survival, the gibbons appear to use the song not just to warn their own group members, but those in neighbouring areas.”—Science Daily

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061221074623.htm

If primates can throat sing and humans can throat sing maybe we can break some communication barriers with this technique.

We’ve all heard Sierra Sounds, we know the communication they use there is something we can’t mimic…but what about throat singing as an in between?

https://youtu.be/VGfIIjN-P7o

It was a great Reddit post. And who knows? Get the right singer at the right location and maybe we’ll get lucky?

Have an awesome Friday everyone!

The Woman Who Faced Bigfoot Multiple Times And Even Talked To Them – Hot News

The Woman Who Faced Bigfoot Multiple Times And Even Talked To Them – Hot News
— Read on risenewses.com/the-woman-who-faced-bigfoot-multiple-times-and-even-talked-to-them/